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Hey Girl Hey! 

I'm Javonne Crumby, creator of Lesbionyx-- A space for queer women of color. As a Black woman who loves women, I grew tired of the lack of representation and resources for women like me. So I created a platform for us and by us, because no one tells our stories like us! 

Write-Her Lena Waithe Graces Vanity Fair Magazine!

Write-Her Lena Waithe Graces Vanity Fair Magazine!

Lena Waithe has graced the April 2018 issue of Vanity Fair and WE ARE LIVING! This astounding placement of a black queer woman who is rising to the top of media super stardom as a cover girl, is also in alignment with the magazine’s new Editor-In-Chief, Radhika Jones

 Photo by Annie Leibovitz

Photo by Annie Leibovitz

Many of us became familiar with Lena Waithe as the breakout actor on the hit show Master of None where she plays an out lesbian and close friend of Aziz Ansari’s character. In September of 2017, she became the first black woman to win an Emmy for 'Outstanding Writing for a Comedy Series' for the “Thanksgiving” episode of Master of None. It was an emotional yet comedic retelling of her experience coming out to her mother. Since then she has gone on to create and executive produce a new hit show The Chi on Showtime, which just wrapped its first season. Outside of her career and accolades, 33-year-old Waithe has become a beacon of diversity, representation, uniqueness, queerness, and blackness in media that is vital to our screens and our real world. 

 Photo courtesy of Netflix ( Master of None  episode "Thanksgiving", Season 2, Episode 8) 

Photo courtesy of Netflix (Master of None episode "Thanksgiving", Season 2, Episode 8) 

Waithe’s incredible profile was written by Jacqueline Woodson, and covered everything from her humble beginnings as an assistant to director Gina Prince-Bythewood and production assistant to Ava DuVernay, to her strong passion for stories and storytelling being done by us. She expresses in the interview, “I am tired of white folks telling my stories. We gotta tell our shit. Can’t no one tell a black story, particularly a queer story, the way I can, because I see the God in us. James Baldwin saw the God in us. Zora saw the God in us. When I’m looking for myself, I find myself in the pages of Baldwin.” 

 Photo courtesy of Daniel Boczarski of Getty Images

Photo courtesy of Daniel Boczarski of Getty Images

She also talks about being in Hollywood and finding compliments on her style and presence as unnecessary. She says these come from fashion wannabes like "That’s dope, you’re cool.” Waithe very directly articulates “Being black and gay, having dreadlocks, having a certain kind of swag, and dressing the way I do… I don’t feel validated by that. . . . I don’t want to be White. I don’t want to be straight. I don’t want to blend in. . . . I try to wear queer designers who happen to be brown and makin’ shit.”

 Photo by Annie Liebovitz | Waithe wearing  Well-Read Black Girl  T-Shirt

Photo by Annie Liebovitz | Waithe wearing Well-Read Black Girl T-Shirt

 

Read the full Vanity Fair cover story here!

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